Gestational Diabetics – How Many Are There?

I am looking to find out roughly how many women are pregnant each year

and how many get gestational diabetes. Could you help?



3 thoughts on “Gestational Diabetics – How Many Are There?

  1. Hello irga-ga,

    The statistics for gestational diabetes are rather imprecise, even

    among experts. Oddly, the American Diabetes Association publishes two

    very different statistics:

    "Gestational diabetes affects about 4% of all pregnant women – about

    135,000 cases of gestational diabetes in the United States each year."

    "Gestational Diabetes"

    American Diabetes Association

    http://www.diabetes.org/main/info/affected/women/gestation_diab.jsp

    "Approximately 7% of all pregnancies are complicated by GDM, resulting

    in more than 200,000 cases annually."

    "Gestational Diabetes Mellitus" (Diabetes Care 25:S94-S96, 2002)

    American Diabetes Association

    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/25/suppl_1/s94

    The latter statistic comes from an official "position statement" — so

    one might presume that it is more accurate. Yet, publications from

    the National Institutes of Health support the former statistic,

    stating:

    "Approximately 3 to 5 percent of all pregnant women in the United

    States are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes."

    "Understanding Gestational Diabetes"

    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    National Institutes of Health

    http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/gest1.htm

    "Nearly 135,000 pregnant women get the condition every year …."

    "Are You at Risk for Gestational Diabetes?"

    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

    National Institutes of Health

    http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/gest_diabetes.htm

    At least both of these statistics imply a basic agreement on the

    number of pregnancies in the United States: approximately 3 million

    per year. (200,000 divided by 7% is a little under 3 million, while

    135,000 divided by 4% is a little more than 3 million.) Yet, the most

    common statistic I have seen is that there are about 6 million

    pregnancies in the United States per year. Even though the statistic

    is several years old, it's hard to imagine that the number has since

    dropped to 3 million. Here is one example of this statistic:

    "The Whole Truth About Contraception: A Guide to Safe and Effective

    Choices (1997)" (Joseph Henry Press) [Chapter 18 – Abortion – page

    231]

    National Academies Press

    http://www.nap.edu/books/030905494X/html/231.html

    This page may also indicate one reason why the numbers are not so far

    apart; approximately 1.5 million pregnancies are ended by abortion.

    In addition, it is likely that a sizable number of pregnancies end in

    miscarriage; I have seen indications of close to 1 million per year.

    Perhaps cases of abortion, miscarriages, and lack of medical attention

    explain the discrepancy between the gestational diabetes statistics

    and the overall pregnancy statistics. But this is just my

    speculation.

    Despite the confusing statistics, I hope that this information is

    helpful.

    – justaskscott-ga

    Search strategy —

    Searched on Google Directory for:

    diabetes

    Searched on Google for:

    "gestational diabetes" site:gov

    "million pregnancies in the united states"

    "million pregnancies in the us"

    "million pregnancies" site:www.nap.edu

  2. Can you tell me how many type 1 versus type 2 women get pregnant each

    year? There are 1.2 mm type 1 diabetics in the US and probably 400,000

    of childbearing age. Gestational is all type 2. Please write me if

    you need more money for this, I'm happy to pay but I'd love to work

    with the same researcher, who did a stellar job.

  3. Thank you for your kind words about my original answer.

    Right now, I won't have sufficient time to do the necessary research

    for a follow-up answer. We have many excellent Researchers; I hope

    that I'm half as good as some of them! If you need an answer soon,

    you might want to post a new question, so that another Researcher may

    attempt to answer it.

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